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Have Dense Breasts? Here's What That Means

Did your last mammogram report say you have dense breasts? Almost half of all women who get mammograms are found to have dense breasts, and many don't know what it means.

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Where to Find Convenient Health Care

You've twisted your ankle and it's Saturday evening. What should you do? Here is a quick tour of your health care options.

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Test Your Food Safety Knowledge

Food nourishes the body, but when it's unsafe, it can also make us very ill. Test your knowledge of good food safety practices with these true/false questions.

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Cholesterol
There's a lot of news about cholesterol these days, and with good reason. High cholesterol contributes to heart disease, which kills more Americans than all cancers combined. A regular exercise routine and good eating habits — along with medication if your doctor recommends it — can keep cholesterol levels under control and lower your risk of heart disease.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a name given to a group of diseases that limit the flow of air in and out of your lungs. COPD includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Long-time cigarette smoking is the most common cause of COPD.
Men's Health
Stay healthy and vigorous into old age by eating right, getting plenty of exercise and following recommended disease prevention practices.
    Test Your Knowledge.

    Answer this one: What position is best for your back when you sleep?

    The more active you are, the more calories you burn. Running or jogging, for instance, burns more calories than bowling.

    Most people get an occasional bout of heartburn—that burning feeling in the chest about a half-hour after eating. But if you get it often, you may have GERD.

      Watch. Listen. Learn.

      Pre-diabetes means your blood sugar level is above normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Pre-diabetes increases the risk for developing diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is, with healthy lifestyle changes, you can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Take action; watch this video to find out more about what you can do.

      We're living longer these days. Unfortunately, a longer life doesn't necessarily mean a healthier one. Many Americans are struggling with chronic health conditions—and even more of us will in the future. Case in point: heart failure.